Book Recommendations

The hard truth is that not all teens who enter college may graduate. And often it isn’t academics and classwork that trip students up. Transitioning to independent living can be too much or too challenging for teens and this can affect the best of students!

Synthesizing a wealth of recent neuropsychological research, this groundbreaking book focuses on the multiple pathways by which ADHD develops. Joel T. Nigg marshals the best available knowledge on what is actually going on in the symptomatic child’s brain and why.

Hundreds of thousands of students with learning differences head to college every year. This comprehensive guide makes it easy for those students and their families and guidance counselors to tackle the daunting process of finding the school that fits their needs best.

Organized in a step-by-step manner, this book maps out a plan and a timeline for applying to college and keep you organized. Applying to College comes loaded with charts, checklists, and assessments to make your application-centered life easier.

Does toxic pollution cause attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? What about screen use? Are alternative treatments worth exploring? Can dietary changes help? From leading ADHD researcher Joel T. Nigg, this book presents exciting treatment advances grounded in the new science of epigenetics—how genes and the environment interact.

Now in a third edition, Robert M. Sapolsky’s acclaimed and successful Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers features new chapters on how stress affects sleep and addiction, as well as new insights into anxiety and personality disorder and the impact of spirituality on managing stress.

The epidemic of depression in America strikes 30% of all children. Now Martin E. P. Seligman and his colleagues offer parents and educators a program clinically proven to cut that risk in half. Parents can teach children to apply optimism skills.

There’s nothing more frustrating than watching your bright, talented son or daughter struggle with everyday tasks like finishing homework, putting away toys, or following instructions at school. Drs. Peg Dawson and Richard Guare have great news: there’s a lot you can do to help.

Executive functions are the cognitive skills that help us manage our lives and be successful. Children with weak executive skills, despite their best intentions, often do their homework but forget to turn it in, wait until the last minute to start a project.

Gifted children and adults are frequently misdiagnosed, particularly those who are twice-exceptional (2e). This much-anticipated second edition of a best-selling book is your guide to help prevent that.

Bipolar disorder—manic depression—was once thought to be rare in children. Now researchers are discovering not only that bipolar disorder can begin early in life, but that it is much more common than ever imagined.

Gifted children and adults are often misunderstood. Their excitement is viewed as excessive, their high energy as hyperactivity, their persistence as nagging, their imagination as not paying attention, their passion as being disruptive.

Combining cutting-edge neuroscience with the latest discoveries on the human microbiome, a practical guide in the tradition of Wheat Belly and Grain Brain that conclusively demonstrates the inextricable, biological link between mind and body.

Grandin writes from the dual perspectives of a scientist and an autistic person to give a report from “the country of autism.” Introducing a groundbreaking model which analyzes people based on their patterns of thought.

Dylan Peters has lived with Tourette Syndrome more than half of his young life. Only four years old when he was first diagnosed with TS, Dylan is now nine and ready to enter the fourth grade.

There is nothing more essential to our health and well-being than breathing: take air in, let it out, repeat twenty-five thousand times a day. Yet, as a species, humans have lost the ability to breathe correctly, with grave consequences.

Sleep is one of the most important but least understood aspects of our life, wellness, and longevity. Until very recently, science had no answer to the question of why we sleep, or what good it served, or why we suffer such devastating health consequences.

These beautifully illustrated and fun-to-read storybooks simplify and normalize complicated childhood conditions, like Tourette Syndrome. When read aloud, other children can identify why a peer may be treated differently and begin to empathize with them.

For Mark Solms, one of the boldest thinkers in contemporary neuroscience, discovering how consciousness comes about has been a lifetime’s quest. Scientists consider it the “hard problem” because it seems an impossible task.

Now, most people have heard of ADHD and know someone who may have it. But lost in the discussion of both childhood and adult diagnosis of ADHD is the potential upside.

Written specifically for siblings of children with Tourette Syndrome (TS), Why Do You Do That? is an age-appropriate source of information for children and adolescents aged 8 to 16.

Tourette’s Syndrome pretty much just comes out of no where. It’s scary as a parent to try to explain it to everyone, especially your child who has it. This book is a simple way to explain Tourette’s Syndrome.

Trauma is a fact of life. In The Body Keeps the Score, Dr. Bessel van der Kolk uses recent scientific advances to show how trauma literally reshapes both body and brain, compromising sufferers’ capacities for pleasure, engagement, self-control, and trust.